Tuesday, June 2, 2009

Just a Photo to Keep You Interested

While my substantive blogging slows down. BTW, the rust on the Huffeigh's rims (seen above), which I could not remove (trust me, it's not going anywhere) has proven to be a fantastic benefit in the rain. Anyone with steel rims can tell you they don't brake worth a hoot when wet, but the extra texture of the rust seems to help. In fact, I didn't notice much difference from my normal brake performance.

7 comments:

  1. I am glad not to have to learn that lesson, I simply do not ride in the rain. (A leftover from my motorcycle experience, riding in the rain on a motorcycle is not a matter of discomfort, more an exercise in pain and fear.)
    Maybe I should order an alloy front rim from Harris Cycles to improve braking performance?

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  2. The fender looks like the one on the Hercules that I just bought. I know that Raleigh and Hercules merged at one time so I guess that makes sense. Thanks for the great blog. ~Jen

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  3. Why is the reflector housing Black? Even though my bike is black, the white paint on the fender means typically it will have a white housing, yes?

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  4. @ Tinker: I believe it's a matter of when the bike was made. I can't give you a date range, although it's probably out there somewhere on the interwebs, but I believe the black reflector was an earlier style, the white came later, but I'm sure someone has contradictory information, so I'll leave the question open.

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  5. I have similar experience with Beauty and Beast: a little bit of unremovable rust makes for good wet-weather braking. One thing that keeps me from wanting to convert to aluminum alloy rims is that with much all-weather riding, there is a chance of the brake pads wearing out the rims! I want my components to last as long as possible.

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  6. I have a bunch of old Raleighs. I found this Turtle Wax Chrome Polish, that is really cheap and can work wonders. You just apply the product (goopy paste) and let it dry, then buff with an old towel or t shirt. Rust pretty much falls off the rims. It is not perfect, but with a bit of elbow grease, I have made a lot of the old Notttingham chrome gleam.
    RB
    townandcountrybiker.wordpress.com

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